18 Ways To Show Your Teen You Are Thankful For Them - Sports World, INC.

18 Ways To Show Your Teen You Are Thankful For Them

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Orig Post www.operationparent.org | Re-Post Sports World 11/18/2015

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1. Advise when asked. There will be times your teen will come to you to fix a problem. But generally, only offer advice if they ask for it. Be sparing. Too much advice can feel like judgment to a teen. Listen to them when they talk to you – really listen, don’t just nod along. Sometimes it’s just as important to hear what they aren’t saying as it is to hear the actual words.

2. Look at them. I am guilty of doing other things while listening to my kids, which means I’m not giving them my undivided attention. Sometimes, our kids need us to look at them when they talk so they know that they are the most important thing to us in that moment.

3. Talk & Laugh. Spend time talking with your teens. Tell them about your day, about what life was like when you were their ages, what you’re struggling with. Laughing together is a great feeling that creates security and trust. Find a way to laugh with (not at!) your teen!

4. Say yes. Sometimes it’s easy to say no without really thinking about the request. Give your teens some freedom, let them take (reasonable) risks, and give them a chance to make their own choices.

5. Say no. They may be teens and they may be morphing into adults, but teens still need boundaries. Provide them, with love.

6. Respect their struggles. Sometimes those things our teens are struggling with seem so insignificant in comparison to our adult struggles, but it’s all a matter of perspective. Their struggles are very real and very important to them. Remind yourself, when your child is stressing about something that seems trivial to you, that it’s not trivial to them. Respect what they’re going through.

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